The Commemoration in Russia of the Centenary of the 1917 Revolution(s): Comparative Analysis of Rival Narratives

The Commemoration in Russia of the Centenary of the 1917 Revolution(s):
Comparative Analysis of Rival Narratives


Malinova O.Yu.,

Professor, National Research University Higher School of Economics; Principal Researcher, Department of Political Science, Institute of Scientific Information for Social Sciences, RAS, omalinova@mail.ru


elibrary_id: 197217 |


DOI: 10.17976/jpps/2018.02.04

For citation:

Malinova O.Yu. The Commemoration in Russia of the Centenary of the 1917 Revolution(s): Comparative Analysis of Rival Narratives. – Polis. Political Studies. 2018. No. 2. P. 37-56. (In Russ.). https://doi.org/10.17976/jpps/2018.02.04



Abstract

The article presents the results of the study of public commemoration of the centenary of the February and October revolutions in Russia as the episode of politics of memory. It compares historical narratives of the key mnemonic actors – the ruling elite, the Communists, the Russian Orthodox Church, the “Conservatives”, the Liberals etc. The analysis is based on the recent texts of politicians and public intellectuals from these groups. The historical narratives are compared by five criteria: 1) the main idea (that usually follows from the mission / political program / identity); 2) the plot (that is usually focused on the story about tragedy and trauma that Russia experienced in the 20th century); 3) the events that come as causally linked elements of the narrative; 4) the main actors; 5) the lessons that should be leant. It is concluded that actually the commemoration of the centenary of the revolution(s) took part in the context of a fragmented memory regime. However, the discrepancy of competing interpretations have not brought an open public conflict because the mnemonic warriors either experienced a lack of resources for more active propaganda, or partly shared the attitudes of the ruling elite. As a result, by avoiding the official commemoration the latter escaped direct public discussions, and could turn the commemorative process to the “peaceful” path. 

Keywords
centenary of the 1917 Revolution in Russia; commemoration; the infrastructure of collective memory; mnemonic actors; memory politics; politics of memory; historical narrative.


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Content No. 2, 2018

See also:


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The Commemoration in Russia of the Centenary of the 1917 Revolution(s): Analysis of Strategies of the Key Mnemonic Actors. – Polis. Political Studies. 2018. No1

Malinova O.Yu.,
The Official Historical Narrative as a Part of Identity Policy of the Russian State: From the 1990s to the 2000s. – Polis. Political Studies. 2016. No6

Zarubina N.N., Noskova A.V.,
Images of Russia: Reflecting on the Eras of Change. – Polis. Political Studies. 2019. No2

Kraev O.L., Silantieva M.V.,
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Fadeyeva L.A.,
Matrix of Memory, Politics and Place (On Cultures of Public Memory as Constituent Part of Political Cultures). – Polis. Political Studies. 2006. No1

 
 

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